Researchers

Dr KnabbJoshua Knabb, PsyD, ABPP, is a board certified clinical psychologist, specializing in individual and couples therapy. Residing in Southern California with his wife and two children, Dr. Knabb is an associate professor of psychology at California Baptist University (CBU), serving as director of the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology program in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. In addition to his work as an educator and psychotherapist, Dr. Knabb's writings and research have been published in a variety of academic journals and textbooks over the last decade. His research interests include marriage and the family, psychological assessment, the psychology of religion, attachment theory, mindfulness-based therapies and contemplative Christianity. In recent years, Dr. Knabb has been especially drawn toward the writings of the early desert Christians, which seem to capture a well-developed psychospiritual understanding of the human condition, rooted in humility, patience, surrender, acceptance, intrapsychic awareness, detachment, a courageous willingness to let go, and a deep longing to connect to God on a more intimate level. These writings, from Dr. Knabb's perspective, are highly relevant for Christian psychotherapy clients in contemporary Western society, who are often exhausted by futile efforts to fully eradicate their recurrent symptoms and looking for an alternative way to live a life authentically devoted to God.

 

Dr Vazquez

Veola Vazquez, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and professor of psychology in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences at California Baptist University. Dr. Vazquez lives in Southern California with her husband and two teenage boys. She has specialized clinical training in working with severe childhood disorders and childhood trauma. In addition to research interests focused on contemplative Christian meditation interventions, Dr. Vazquez is particularly interested in issues related to cultural diversity and the development of character virtues and virtuous living within a variety of ethnic, racial and cultural contexts (including within the context of the Christian faith tradition). In her work, she seeks to shed light on the psychological, societal and relational processes involved in these experiences. Overall, she strives to use rigorous scientific inquiry to better understand individuals, groups and cultures, and to, therefore, teach others how they may live a life that is glorifying to God.

 

Research Interests

  • Psychological correlates of Christian meditative practices
  • The link between Christian meditation and transdiagnostic constructs for explaining emotional disorders
  • Mechanisms of action and change within Christian meditation
  • Similarities and differences between Christian- and Buddhist-informed meditation
  • 21st century adaptations of Christian meditation
  • Christian meditation for physical, psychological, social and spiritual health
  • Christian meditation for psychiatric disorders
  • Group delivery models of Christian meditation for Christian communities
  • Christian meditation and denominational affiliation
  • Barriers to Christian meditation within the church and community