Demand For Tesol

Local Demand

With the introduction of the New Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards in California as well as 44 other states across the U.S., the need for qualified personnel to teach English Language Learners (ELLs) is at an all-time high for the following reasons:

  • The new Standards require greater language competency in order to for students to read complex texts, explain and articulate understanding of material, mathematical processes, and experiments, verbally discuss, argue and present findings.
  • The U.S. immigrant population continues to grow at an overwhelming rate. According to the Institute of International Education, the percentage of ELLs in U.S. public schools has increased from 8.7 percent (or an estimated 4.1 million students) in 2002-03 to 9.2 percent (or 4.4 million in 2012-13) and the numbers continue to rise.
  • Furthermore, California is considered as one out of six states with the highest percentages of ELL students.

International Demand

In addition, with English becoming the language of choice for many global corporations and institutions, jobs for teaching English overseas are also in great demand.

  • English is quickly becoming the global language of the world.  It is widely used in business, science, broadcasting, navigation, aviation and the Internet; thus, making it the number one language being sought by most international companies today.
  • According to the British Council, there are more than 750 million people speaking English as a foreign language and an estimated 1 billion people learning English throughout the world.
  • Most countries now require students to begin learning English at an early age in order to be more marketable in the future. Over half of the world’s international students are taught in English, and more countries are establishing English-medium courses.
  • The U.S. continues to be the number one destination for international adults and students seeking better opportunities. As reported by Open Doors in 2010/11, the number of international students in the U.S. increased to a record high of 723,277, a 32% increase since 2000/01.