Course Requirements

The PsyD in Clinical Psychology program at California Baptist University is comprised of the following course requirements:

Core Requirements (15 units)

PSY722 Human Dvlpmnt Across the Lifespn

This course focuses on lifespan development, including a range of theories and empirical models within the developmental psychology literature. The various stages of life, physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development, and death and dying are explored, applying this understanding to the procession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Summer)

PSY725 History of Psychological Science

This course focuses on the history and systems of psychology, including philosophical foundations, key movements and figures that influenced the field, the formal founding of the discipline of psychology, and current theoretical orientations, specialty areas, and empirical models, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Fall)

PSY726 Cogntve & Affectve Bases of Bhvr

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical models of emotion, affect, and mood, including the various roles that emotional states play in human behavior, as well as higher order cognitive processes, such as memory, knowledge, learning, and thinking. Cognitive and affective bases of behavior are integrated so as to help students obtain an advanced knowledge base within the discipline of psychology, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Spring)

PSY736 Behavioral Neuroscience

This course focuses on the biological bases of human behavior, exploring the structure and functioning of the brain, neurochemistry, hormones, genetic influences, and biological contributing factors to psychopathology. This understanding of neuroscience is applied to the profession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Fall)

PSY745 Human Social Behavior

This course focuses on social psychology, including social perception, attitudes, biases, group processes, and discrimination, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Spring)

State of California Course Requirements (12 units)

PSY711 Child Abs Rprt, Assmnt, & Trtmnt

This course focuses on child abuse and neglect, including the assessment and treatment of childhood abuse, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Legal and ethical issues are explored, along with physical and behavioral signs of abuse, techniques to intervene, community-based services, and mandatory reporting requirements. (2 units; Fall)

PSY735 Addictive Behavior

This course focuses on addictive behaviors, including the etiology, assessment, and treatment of alcohol and substance use disorders, as well as risk prevention and factors and dual diagnoses, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Other addictive behaviors will also be explored, including eating, Internet, and gambling disorders, as well as sexual addiction. A biopsychosocial-spiritual approach will be emphasized in conceptualizing and treating addictive behaviors. (2 units; Fall)

PSY746 Intimate Partner Abuse

This course focuses on spousal and partner abuse assessment and treatment, including theoretical and empirical models of domestic violence, as well as evidence-based treatment programs for offenders and victims and community resources, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. (2 units; Spring)

PSY756 Aging and Long-Term Care

This course focuses on aging and long-term care, including a developmental viewpoint on the biological, psychological, and social factors that contribute to health and dysfunction among older adults, as well as theoretical and empirical treatment approaches in working with older adults in psychotherapy, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Community resources are also explored. (2 units; Fall)

PSY765 Clinical Psychopharmacology

This course focuses on psychotropic medications, exploring the use of biological interventions for a range of DSM-5 disorders and applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. The neurobiology of mental disorders is emphasized, along with randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of psychotropic medications. Referral considerations are discussed, as are medication side effects and research comparing medication and psychotherapy outcomes for the more common DSM-5 disorders. (2 units; Spring)

PSY766 Humn Sxlty, Sxl Disordrs & Trtmt

This course focuses on human sexuality, including sexual behaviors, and sexual disorders, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. The assessment and treatment of sexual disorders are emphasized. A biopsychosocial approach will be employed, with students exploring the biological, psychological, and social-cultural contributing factors to sexual health and dyfunction, as well as contemporary theoretical and empirical models. (2 units; Summer)

Assessment Course Requirements (10 units)

PSY741 Assessment I: Personality Tstng

This course focuses on reliable, valid personality testing instruments, including (but not limited to) the MMPI-2 and newer MMPI-2-RF, MCMI-IV, PAI, and 16PF. Administration, scoring, and interpretation considerations are explored, as well as report writing and strategies for integrating a presenting problem, background information, behavioral observations/mental status exam, reliability and validity of tests used, data from multiple tests, diagnostic impression, and treatment recommendations into a final assessment report. Prerequisite: PSY 723. (3 units; Fall)

PSY742 Assment II: Intlgnc Tstng w/lab

This course focuses on intelligence and other forms of cognitive testing, including the Wechsler scales and memory and achievement testing. Students explore cultural and other important considerations when administering, scoring, and interpreting cognitive testing. An additional lab is required that allows students to practice test administration. Report writing strategies are explored, integrating the presenting problem, background information, behavioral observations/mental status exam, reliability and validity of tests used, data from multiple cognitive tests, diagnostic impression, and treatment considerations into a final assessment report. Prerequisite: PSY 723. (4 units; Spring)

PSY743 Assessment III: Projective Tstng

This course focuses on projective testing, including the Rorschach (using Exner's scoring system), Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), Human Figure Drawing, House-Tree-Person, and Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank. Students practice administering, interpreting, and scoring projective tests, and report writing strategies are explored, integrating the presenting problem, background information, behavioral observations/mental status exam, reliability and validity of tests used, data from multiple cognitive tests, diagnostic impression, and treatment considerations into a final assessment report. Prerequisite: PSY 723. (3 units; Summer)

Faith Integration Course Requirements (12 units)

PSY761 Psych & Christianity I: Theology

As the first of four courses, students focus on understanding and applying Christian theology to the foundations of clinical psychology. Referred to as an “integrationist” approach, students learn to competently integrate a Christian view of God into previously-established theoretical and empirical models within clinical psychology so as to help Christian clients ameliorate suffering. Students also develop the ability to start from a Christian view of the triune God, exploring ways to build theoretical and empirical models that are rooted in the Bible in order to help Christian clients heal, integrating clinical psychology as a way to strength a distinctly Christian view of God. Areas of investigation, from an “integrationist” perspective, include the God image, God attachment, and religious coping literatures, along with “Christian psychology” topics, such as how a view of God’s infinite power, wisdom, love, and holiness impacts mental health and the Trinity as a model for human relational functioning. These themes, among others, will be applied to clinical practice, including the assessment and treatment of Christian clients in psychotherapy. Prerequisites: PSY 700 and 725. (3 units; Fall)

PSY762 Psych&Chrstn II: Wldvw Onto&Epst

Building on the first course in this four-course series, students focus on understanding and applying the basics of a Christian worldview to the foundations of clinical psychology, comparing and contrasting these building blocks with the various worldviews in psychology today. Students also explore ontology, before moving on to epistemology. Finally, students review the various epistemologies, applying them to the foundations of clinical psychology. Focusing on three distinct epistemologies—reason, empiricism, and divine revelation—students explore the prioritization of ways of knowing from psychological and Christian perspectives. From an “integrationist” point of view, empiricism is heavily relied upon as a starting point, followed by attempts to integrate divine revelation. On the other hand, “Christian psychology” attempts to begin with divine revelation, turning to empiricism as a way to deepen an understanding of scripture and God’s design. Each of these ways of knowing is detailed, along with strategies to apply the various epistemologies to research design and clinical practice, culminating with the effective, ethical, and competent care of Christian clients. Prerequisite: PSY 761. (3 units; Spring)

PSY763 Psych&Chrstn III: Blcl Anth&Axlg

Building on the first course in this four-course series, students focus on understanding and applying the basics of a Christian worldview to the foundations of clinical psychology, comparing and contrasting these building blocks with the various worldviews in psychology today. Students also explore ontology, before moving on to epistemology. Finally, students review the various epistemologies, applying them to the foundations of clinical psychology. Focusing on three distinct epistemologies—reason, empiricism, and divine revelation—students explore the prioritization of ways of knowing from psychological and Christian perspectives. From an “integrationist” point of view, empiricism is heavily relied upon as a starting point, followed by attempts to integrate divine revelation. On the other hand, “Christian psychology” attempts to begin with divine revelation, turning to empiricism as a way to deepen an understanding of scripture and God’s design. Each of these ways of knowing is detailed, along with strategies to apply the various epistemologies to research design and clinical practice, culminating with the effective, ethical, and competent care of Christian clients. Prerequisite: PSY 762. (3 units; Fall)

PSY764 Psych & Chrstn IV: Redemption

Concluding the four-course series, students review and apply redemptive considerations to clinical practice, including God’s common and special grace. Focusing primarily on the redemption God offers within the Christian life, students explore the notion of communion with God, including the psychological and spiritual benefits of spiritual formative practices, as well as topics such as mercy, grace, justification, sanctification, divine union, solitude, and fellowship with both God and other Christians in the Body of Christ. Special attention is devoted to Christian contemplative practices, including burgeoning empirical support for contemplative prayer as a Christian alternative to mindfulness-based interventions in psychotherapy. Prerequisite: PSY 763. (3 units; Spring)

Intervention Course Requirements (18 units)

PSY771 Intvn I: Psychodynmc Appr to Trt

This course focuses on psychodynamic approaches to treatment in clinical psychology, including theoretical foundations, intervention strategies, and the evaluation of treatment progress. Classical psychoanalysis, object relations, self psychology, intersubjectivity, relational psychoanalysis, and time-limited psychotherapy are covered, as well as newer developments in the field. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop psychodynamic intervention skills. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Fall)

PSY772 Intvn II: Cgntv-Bhvr Appr to Trt

This course focuses on cognitive-behavioral approaches to treatment in clinical psychology, including theoretical foundations, evidencebased intervention strategies, and the evaluation of treatment progress. Behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, and mindfulness- and acceptancebased treatments are explored, as are newer transdiagnostic approaches in clinical psychology. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop cognitive-behavioral intervention skills. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Spring)

PSY773 Intvn III: Couples Appr to Trtmt

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical models of couples therapy, including (but not limited to) cognitive-behavioral, integrative behavioral, emotionally focused, the Gottman method, and psychodynamic approaches. Special issues and populations relevant to couples therapy are covered, as are evaluation strategies for monitoring treatment progress, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Students are exposed to the American Psychological Association's specialty area of couple and family psychology, drawing from this body of literature to guide couples work in clinical practice. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop intervention skills with couples. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Summer)

PSY774 Intvn IV: Family Apprch to Trtmt

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical models of family therapy, including (but not limited to) cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, systemic, postmodern, and other family interventions. Special issues and populations relevant to family therapy are covered, as are evaluation strategies for monitoring treatment progress, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Students are exposed to the American Psychological Association's specialty area of couple and family psychology, drawing from this body of literature to guide family interventions in clinical practice. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop intervention skills with families. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Fall)

PSY775 Intvn V: Chld & Adol Appr to Trt

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical models of child and adolescent therapy, including (but not limited to) cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, collaborative problem solving, systemic, and postmodern approaches. Students review strategies to evaluate treatment progress, and are exposed to the American Psychological Association's specialty area of clinical child and adolescent psychology, drawing from this body of literature to guide child and adolescent interventions in clinical practice. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop intervention skills with children and adolescents. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Spring)

PSY776 Intvn VI: Group Apprchs to Trmt

This course focuses on theoretical and evidence-based models of group therapy, including (but not limited to) Yalom's eclectic approach and cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and other group-focused theoretical orientations. Students review strategies to evaluate treatment progress, and are exposed to the American Psychological association's specialty area of group therapy, drawing from this body of literature to guide group interventions in clinical practice. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop intervention skills for groups. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Summer)

Practicum Course Requirements (31 units)

PSY700 Theories of Psychotherapy

This course focuses on the major theories of psychotherapy, including supporting research and newer, emerging models in the field. Psychodynamic, humanistic-existential, cognitive-behavioral, postmodern, and systems theories of personality and psychotherapy are explored, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Students are exposed to the American Psychological Association's specialty area in clinical psychology. (3 units; Fall)

PSY700-A
Knabb, Joshua J.
09/04/2018 W 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM TBA

PSY702 Psychiatric Disorders

This course focuses on psychopathology, including the prevalence, etiology, maintenance, and treatment of DSM-5 diagnoses, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Fall)

PSY702-A
Pate, Robert Anthony
09/04/2018 M 7:30 PM - 10:00 PM TBA

PSY712 Cultural Diversity

This course focuses on individual and cultural diversity (ICD), including the dimensions of culture, race, ethnicity, age, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, language, socioeconomic status, disability, and national origin, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. A special emphasis is placed on helping students cultivate the flexibility and self-awareness necessary to see the self as different from others, honoring cultural differences and client self-determination as they learn to work effectively with a wide variety of worldviews in assessment and psychotherapy contexts. (3 units; Spring)

PSY713 Law and Ethics in Clinical Psych

This course focuses on the APA Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct, California law for mental health professionals, and federal law (e.g., HIPAA), applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Within this course, applying both law and ethics to clinical practice also involves using peer-reviewed decisionmaking models, as well as consultation, to arrive at an ethical solution, with the best interest of the client in mind. (3 units; Spring)

PSY720 Clinical Practice I: Basic Sklls

This course focuses on the development of basic helping skills in psychotherapy, including the importance of the client-therapist relationship, the here-and-now, process versus content, self-awareness, empathy, warmth, building and maintaining a therapeutic alliance, establishing treatment goals, and working towards change, applying this skill-set to the profession of clinical psychology. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students develop foundational clinical skills. (2 units; Fall)

PSY720-A
Pate, Robert Anthony
09/04/2018 M 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM TBA

PSY730 Clncl Prc II: Adv Skls & Trt Pln

This course focuses on the continued development of helping skills in psychotherapy, exploring transference and countertransference, process comments, the corrective relational experience, ruptures and repairs in the therapeutic alliance, and working through clients' problematic relational patterns, applying this skill-set to the profession of clinical psychology. Treatment planning and progress note writing are also emphasized, including the various models of documentation used within clinical psychology. Direct observation is used via mock therapy sessions to help students continue to develop clinical skills. Prerequisite: PSY 720. (2 units; Spring)

PSY740 Clinical Practcm I: Profssionlsm

This course is a forum for students to explore practicum-related experiences at an internal practicum site, receiving consultation from faculty on topics such as professional development, legal and ethical considerations, case conceptualization, diagnosing, and assessment and intervention strategies, and serving as a source of support for students receiving clinical supervision. Direct observation is used at students’ practicum sites to help them develop clinical skills. For Clinical Practicum I, students must be making progress towards 500 total hours of practicum experience, which are completed by the end of Clinical Practicum II. Clinical Practice I and II serve as the foundation for this course, and students focus on the competencies of professionalism, professional values, and attitudes during the semester. Prerequisites: PSY 700, 702, 712, 713, and 730. (2 units; Fall)

PSY750 Clincl Prctcm II: Intrprsnl Skls

This course is a continued forum for students to explore practicum-related experiences at an internal practicum site, receiving consultation from faculty on topics such as professional development, legal and ethical considerations, case conceptualization, diagnosing, and assessment and intervention strategies, and serving as a source of support for students receiving clinical supervision. Direct observation is used at students’ practicum sites to help them develop clinical skills. For Clinical Practicum II, students must complete at least 500 total hours of practicum experience, some of which were obtained while in Clinical Practicum I. Clinical Practice I and II serve as the foundation for this course, and students focus on the competencies of relationships and interpersonal skills during the semester. Prerequisite: PSY 740. (2 units; Spring)

PSY760 Clincl Practcm III: Reflctv Prac

This course is a forum for students to explore practicum-related experiences at an external practicum site, receiving consultation from faculty on topics such as professional development, legal and ethical considerations, case conceptualization, diagnosing, and assessment and intervention strategies, and serving as a source of support for students receiving clinical supervision. Direct observation is used at students’ practicum sites to help them develop clinical skills. For Clinical Practicum III, students must be making progress towards 500 total hours of practicum experience, which are completed by the end of Clinical Practicum IV. Students focus on the competencies of reflective practice, self-assessment, and self-care throughout the semester. Prerequisite: PSY 750. (2 units; Fall)

PSY770 Clncl Prctcm IV: Evdnc-Bsd Prctc

This course is a forum for students to explore practicum-related experiences at an external practicum site, receiving consultation from faculty on topics such as professional development, legal and ethical considerations, case conceptualization, diagnosing, and assessment and intervention strategies, and serving as a source of support for students receiving clinical supervision. Direct observation is used at students’ practicum sites to help them develop clinical skills. For Clinical Practicum IV, students must complete at least 500 total hours of practicum experience, some of which were obtained while in Clinical Practicum III. Students focus on the competency of evidence-based practice throughout the semester. Prerequisite: PSY 760. (2 units; Spring)

PSY780 Clncl Prctcm V: Intrdscplnry Sys

This course is a forum for students to explore practicum-related experiences at an external practicum site, receiving consultation from faculty on topics such as professional development, legal and ethical considerations, case conceptualization, diagnosing, and assessment and intervention strategies, and serving as a source of support for students receiving clinical supervision. Direct observation is used at students’ practicum sites to help them develop clinical skills. For Clinical Practicum V, students must be making progress towards 500 total hours of practicum experience, which are completed by the end of Clinical Practicum VI. Students focus on the competency of interdisciplinary systems throughout the semester. Prerequisite: PSY 770. (2 units; Fall)

PSY790 Clncl Practcm VI: Client Advcacy

This course is a forum for students to explore practicum-related experiences at an external practicum site, receiving consultation from faculty on topics such as professional development, legal and ethical considerations, case conceptualization, diagnosing, and assessment and intervention strategies, and serving as a source of support for students receiving clinical supervision. Direct observation is used at students’ practicum sites to help them develop clinical skills. For Clinical Practicum VI, students must complete at least 500 total hours of practicum experience, some of which were obtained while in Clinical Practicum V. Students focus on the competency of client advocacy throughout the semester. Prerequisite: PSY 780. (2 units; Spring)

PSY791 Clinical Internship I

This course requires a full-time internship, with students obtaining 1,800 hours of supervised professional experience within a 50-week placement. Students are advised to secure an APA-accredited or APPIC internship. The internship must be approved by the Director of Clinical Training, and permission to begin the internship year must be granted by the Director of the PsyD Program. Direct observation is used at students’ internship sites to help them develop clinical skills. Pass/Fail. (1 unit; Fall)

PSY792 Clinical Internship II

This course corresponds with the second semester of a full-time internship, with students obtaining 1,800 hours of supervised professional experience within a 50-week placement. Direct observation is used at students' internship sites to help them develop clinical skills. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 791. (1 unit; Spring)

PSY793 Clinical Internship III

This course corresponds with the third and final semester of a full-time internship, with students obtaining 1,800 hours of supervised professional experience within a 50-week placement. Direct observation is used at students' internship sites to help them develop clinical skills. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 792. (1 unit; Summer)

Supervision Course Requirements (3 units)

PSY755 Suprvsn & Consltn in Clncl Psych

This course focuses on the role of supervisor in clinical practice, including an understanding of the models, expectations, roles, procedures and processes, supervisee knowledge and skill acquisition, and supervisor-supervisee relationship. The role of consultant is also explored, emphasizing consultation-based services. Students learn to recognize the unique role of a consultant as separate from therapists, faculty members, or supervisors, identifying and applying assessment strategies and methods that are grounded in the consultation literature. Taking context into consideration, students focus on properly addressing the referral question so as to offer helpful recommendations. (3 units; Summer)

Research Course Requirements (18 units)

PSY704 Statistics in Psychology

This course focuses on statistics within the psychological sciences, including descriptive and inferential statistics, univariate and multivariate analytic strategies, hypothesis testing, power, effect sizes, and estimation, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. (3 units; Fall)

PSY704-A
Knabb, Joshua J.
09/04/2018 W 7:30 PM - 10:00 PM TBA

PSY714 Research Methods in Psychology

This course focuses on both quantitative and qualitative research methods within the psychological sciences, as well as experimental and non-experimental research designs. Assessment strategies, sampling methods, replication, approaches for testing and validating theories, meta-analyses, and strengths and limitations of the various research methods and designs are explored. This understanding of research is applied to the profession of clinical psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 704. (3 units; Spring)

PSY723 Psychometrics

This course focuses on psychometrics, including psychological measurement, scale development, strategies to evaluate measurement quality, standardization, measurement theory, reliability, and validity, applying this understanding to the profession of clinical psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 714. (3 units; Summer)

PSY751 Research Team I

In this course, students join a research group within the Center for the Study of Human Behavior, which involves developing an original, empirical research project under the supervision of a faculty team leader and collaborating with student peers. This project may lead to the further development of a dissertation topic, or students may wish to co-present or publish their findings at an academic conference or within an academic journal. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 723. (1 unit; Fall)

PSY752 Research Team II

In this course, students continue to work within a research group at the Center for the Study of Human Behavior, which involves continuing to develop an original, empirical research project under the supervision of a faculty team leader and collaborating with student peers. This project may lead to the further development of a dissertation topic, or students may wish to co-present or publish their findings at an academic conference or within an academic journal. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 751. (1 unit; Spring)

PSY753 Research Team III

In this course, students continue to work within a research group at the Center for the Study of Human Behavior, which involves continuing to develop an original, empirical research project under the supervision of a faculty team leader and collaborating with student peers. This project may lead to the further development of a dissertation topic, or students may wish to co-present or publish their findings at an academic conference or within an academic journal. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 752. (1 unit; Summer)

PSY781 Dissertation I

In this course, students select one of several types of dissertations, including a quantitative, qualitative, literature review, program development, or theoretical dissertation, working collaboratively with their dissertation chair to design, propose, and defend a dissertation before graduation. Students are also encouraged to submit a condensed version to a peer-reviewed academic journal for publication. For students conducting a quantitative dissertation, the Research Team course sequence can serve as the catalyst for further empirical study. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 753. (1 unit; Fall)

PSY782 Dissertation II

In this course, students continue to develop one of several types of dissertations, including a quantitative, qualitative, literature review, program development, or theoretical dissertation, working collaboratively with their dissertation chair to design, propose, and defend a dissertation before graduation. Students are also encouraged to submit a condensed version to a peer-reviewed academic journal for publication. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 781. (1 unit; Spring)

PSY783 Dissertation III

In this course, students continue to develop one of several types of dissertations, including a quantitative, qualitative, literature review, program development, or theoretical dissertation, working collaboratively with their dissertation chair to design, propose, and defend a dissertation before graduation. Students are also encouraged to submit a condensed version to a peer-reviewed academic journal for publication. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 782. (1 unit; Summer)

PSY784 Dissertation IV

In this course, students continue to develop one of several types of dissertations, including a quantitative, qualitative, literature review, program development, or theoretical dissertation, working collaboratively with their dissertation chair to design, propose, and defend a dissertation before graduation. Students are also encouraged to submit a condensed version to a peer-reviewed academic journal for publication. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 783. (1 unit; Fall)

PSY785 Dissertation V

In this course, students continue to develop one of several types of dissertations, including a quantitative, qualitative, literature review, program development, or theoretical dissertation, working collaboratively with their dissertation chair to design, propose, and defend a dissertation before graduation. Students are also encouraged to submit a condensed version to a peer-reviewed academic journal for publication. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 784. (1 unit; Spring)

PSY786 Dissertation VI

In this course, students continue to develop one of several types of dissertations, including a quantitative, qualitative, literature review, program development, or theoretical dissertation, working collaboratively with their dissertation chair to design, propose, and defend a dissertation before graduation. Students are also encouraged to submit a condensed version to a peer-reviewed academic journal for publication. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: PSY 785. (1 unit; Summer)

Elective Requirements

Complete nine (9) units from one of the following elective tracks: 

Forensic Psychology Elective Track

PSY717 An Intro to Fornsc Law & Systems

This course focuses on the specialty area of forensic psychology, introducing students to the intersection between psychology and the law. Students learn about the various roles forensic psychologists play in differing legal systems, as well as the populations forensic psychologists work with. Legal and ethical standards are presented. (3 units; Fall)

PSY718 Forensic Assessment

This course focuses on reliable, valid assessment strategies for forensic populations, including personality and projective testing, as well as risk assessment. Attention is devoted in using assessment in the context of DSM-5 diagnosing, risk assessment, not guilty by reason of insanity defenses, and incompetence to stand trial scenarios. The link between assessment and treatment is also presented. Prerequisite: PSY 723. (3 units; Spring)

PSY719 Forensic Interventions

This course focuses on evidence-based interventions when working with forensic populations. Students explore the psychotherapy literature on mentally-disordered offenders (MDOs), paying particular attention to the empirical literature. Newer developments in the field are also emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY 700. (3 units; Summer)

Organizational Psychology Elective Track

IOP503 Indstrl Orgnztnl Psych & Behavr

This course provides an overview of the impact individuals, groups, and structures have on human behavior within organizations, while also providing an introduction to literature in sociology, psychology, communication, and management. Topics include: individual differences, leadership, work motivation, perception, communication, decision making, power and politics, group development, performance, individual and work team effectiveness, conflict, organizational culture, organizational systems theory, and workplace diversity. (3 units; Fall)

IOP503-A
Fuller, Joshua Auren_K
09/04/2018 W 7:15 PM - 10:00 PM TBA

IOP559 Learning & On-the-Job Developmnt

This course includes tools and methods used to develop effective learning systems within organizational contexts. Also covers foundational theory in learning and training, curriculum and course development, and impact assessment. Explores strategies for utilizing on-the-job experiences as rich developmental opportunities, along with strategic implications of leadership development for the organization. (3 units; Summer)

IOP559-A
Iverson, Nathan David
05/07/2018 W 5:30 PM - 9:30 PM TBA

IOP579 Prgrm Eval & Orgnztnl Consulting

Covers the major models and methods for evaluating the effects of intervention packages or programs on groups and organizations. Emphasizes procedures that the consulting psychologist may use to set goals and objectives, document services, evaluate outcomes, perform cost/benefit analysis, and strategically improve organizational process and/or product. A draft of the Master's Project is completed in this course. (3 units; Spring)

Attachment Theory Elective Track

PSY707 An Intro to Attachment Theory

This course focuses on attachment theory, paying particular attention to empirical developments within the attachment literature. Original writings by John Bowlby, Mary Ainsworth, and Mary Main are explored (among others), along with newer developments in the field. Attachment theory is presented in the context of developmental and clinical psychology, helping students to apply the biological, psychological, and social aspects of attachment to clinical practice. Prerequisites: PSY 700, 722, and 723. (3 units; Fall)

PSY708 Attachment-Based Assmnt Strtgies

This course focuses on reliable, valid measures of attachment, including attachment-based measures for clients in psychotherapy. Attention is devoted to the psychometrics of attachment-based assessment, including strengths and limitations, applying this understanding to clinical practice. Newer developments in the field are explored, as are the different attachment dimensions. Prerequisite: PSY 707. (3 units; Spring)

PSY709 Attachment-Based Intrvntn Strtgs

Building on the Attachment-Based Assessment Strategies course, this course focuses on attachment-based interventions for clients in psychotherapy. Students explore different theoretical and empirical models of intervention in order to competently and effectively work with clients in psychotherapy from a distinctly attachment perspective. Newer models are explored, including evidence-based interventions in the attachment literature. Students learn about ways to apply attachment theory to the profession of clinical psychology, intervening to help clients deepen attachment bonds and ameliorate mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 708. (3 units; Summer)