News • May 17, 2022

CBU students visit Peru for an environmental tour

Riverside, California (May 17, 2022) – Students at California Baptist University traveled to Peru to learn about the environment in that South American country on April 29-May 8.

Students in Field Practicum (ENV 495) learned more about the ecosystem, culture and geology of the planet using Peru as an example. Students saw firsthand the methods Peruvians use to conserve energy and how the environment plays a role in their way of life from growing their food to producing goods.

The tour explored Lima, Cuzco, Sacred Valley, Machu Picchu, Ollantaytambo and Pisac, and it exposed the students to a variety of environments from busy city life to the quiet mountainside.

In addition to approaching the trip from an environmental perspective, students were able to appreciate the country of Peru from a historical and cultural viewpoint. The group acquainted themselves with locals; visited churches, temples and catacombs; and hiked Machu Picchu.

Meaghan Nunley, a biomedical sciences senior, said the trip changed her perspective as she was able to see firsthand how different the United States is from Peru.

“It made me appreciate the conveniences we are so blessed with,” Nunley said. “It has opened my mind seeing a developing country firsthand and observing how they make their own clothes, grow their own food and have little markets to make money.”

Corey Polk, director of Conferences and Events at CBU, accompanied students on the trip. He said a highlight of visiting Peru was learning how Peruvians constructed buildings on the sides of mountains. 

“Seeing how they built from the standpoint of using the environment and drawing on all that useful space along the mountains was fascinating,” Polk said. “The height and proximity of where they built were literally on the tops of mountains. A lot of ingenuity went into it.” 

Jaz Livingstone, an environmental science junior, said one of his favorite moments was visiting CooperarPerú, an organization that works in the areas of education, health and community development to help children and their families.

“These children are from very low-income neighborhoods, some with no electricity, running water or bathrooms,” Livingstone said. “This organization provides them with a safe and healthy learning environment. We could see the impact of poverty and the corrupt government on the community, which made me want to contribute to their effort.”