A minor in history will allow students to study world history and U.S. history in more depth than what's required through general education. As a student of history, you will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as well as strong communication skills, which will prepare you to be an exceptional employee.

If you are passionate about studying history and committed to strengthening your Christian faith, then you should major in history at CBU. With historians who are authentic Christians and excellent teachers, this department shines in the area of faith integration and strong student mentoring.

A general survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and religious developments from 1492 through Reconstruction. (3 units; Fall, Spring, & Online)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
HIS213-B
Curl, Alan
09/03/2024 MWF 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Yeager Center B219
HIS213-A
Curl, Alan
09/03/2024 MWF 8:15 AM - 9:15 AM Yeager Center B219
HIS213-A
Davis-Hayes, Kenya
01/13/2025 TTh 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Park Building 204
HIS213-B
STAFF, STAFF
01/13/2025 MWF 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Health Science Campus V295

A continuation of HIS 213. May be taken before HIS 213. (3 units; Fall, Spring, & Online)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
HIS223-A
Davis-Hayes, Kenya
09/03/2024 TTh 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Yeager Center B112
HIS223-A
STAFF, STAFF
01/13/2025 TTh 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Health Science Campus L240

The course consists of interrelations of history, art, literature, music, and philosophy. It covers the culture-epochs from the Ancient River-Valley Civilizations through the Medieval period. (Meets the Non-US History general education requirement.) (3 units; Fall, Spring, & Online)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
HUM213-A
Brook, Eric C
09/03/2024 TTh 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Yeager Center B258
HUM213-B
Brook, Eric C
09/03/2024 MWF 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Yeager Center B258
HUM213-A
Brook, Eric C
01/13/2025 TTh 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Yeager Center A111
HUM213-B
Brook, Eric C
01/13/2025 MWF 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Health Science Campus S292

The course consists of interrelations of history, art, literature, music, and philosophy. It covers the culture-epochs from the Renaissance to contemporary times. (Meets the Non-US History general education requirement.) (3 units; Fall, Spring, & Online)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
HUM223-A
Brook, Eric C
09/03/2024 MWF 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Yeager Center B258
HUM223-A
Brook, Eric C
01/13/2025 MWF 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Health Science Campus L240

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge about the history of historical writing and research by analyzing the work of important past historians and various philosophies, theories, and perspectives on the nature of history itself. Emphasis will also be given to understanding history from a Christian perspective. (3 units; Fall)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
HIS490-A
Blincoe, Mark E.
09/03/2024 TTh 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Yeager Center B220

Nine additional upper-division units in history

Students may also apply the following to the upper division history elective requirement:

The course explores critically the ways in which at least two of the five areas of the Humanities (Philosophy; Literature; Art; Music; General Culture [History]) are related to the experience of the museum, with specific attention given to the importance of the museum as an educational institution. The particular cultural emphases and museum(s) to visit are left to the discretion of the course instructor. (3 units; Fall)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
HUM325-A
Brook, Eric C
09/03/2024 T 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Yeager Center B258

The course explores critically the ways in which at least two of the five areas of the Humanities (Philosophy; Literature; Art; Music; General Culture [History]) are impacted and interact with the experience of the Holocaust. The focus of this course will be on the Philosophy, Literature, and Art. (3 units; Spring)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation

This course traces the development of western philosophy from the Pre-Socratic thinkers through Immanuel Kant. Emphasis is placed on both interacting with primary source material and on understanding the broad trajectory, and paradigmatic shifts, that have shaped Western thought and culture. (3 units; Fall)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
PHI301-A
Mosteller, Timothy
09/03/2024 MWF 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Park Building 123

This class considers the formative philosophical movements and thinkers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is placed on both interacting with primary source material and on understanding the paradigmatic and cultural shifts brought about by the rejection of, and responses to, Classical and Modern philosophy. Prerequisite: HON 101, PHI 213, 301, or WLD 181. (3 units; Spring)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
PHI302-A
Welbaum, Sam D.
01/13/2025 TTh 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM Park Building

This course examines the origin of Western political, social, and legal thought in order to understand the present through the great political works of the past. It begins in ancient Greece in early democratic Athens and moves through Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. From there, the course explores classical Rome, focusing on Polybius and Cicero. Since the advent of Christianity shapes the development of medieval political thought, the political thought of St. Augustine, John of Salisbury, St. Thomas Aquinas, Marsilio of Padua, Dante, and Thomas More are discussed. (3 units; Fall, odd years)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation

This course entails a comparative study of modern social, legal, and political philosophy, from the Renaissance toward the present by focusing on the great works of the Western traditions, including Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesqueie, Kant, Hegel, Bentham, Marx, Mill. The course examines the relationship between these various political philosophers and the modern political world. (3 units; Spring, even years)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation

This course provides an exploration of the founding of the American Republic. It begins with the colonial period, noting the relationship between religion, liberty, and politics, and then moves to ideas that shaped the American Revolution. From there it analyzes the discussions on the Constitution by both the Federalists and the Antifederalists. The course also examines the discussions surrounding the new Republic and the growth of the nation, including the struggles regarding individualism, liberty, equality, race, gender, wealth, economic regulation, and community responsibility. (3 units; Fall, even years)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
POL427-A
Porter, Chase Martin
09/03/2024 MWF 1:15 PM - 2:15 PM Yeager Center B218

This course examines 20th century responses to modernity and its political and social theories. It focuses on continental philosophers and relates their ideas to contemporary society and politics. It begins with the Frankfurt School of critical theory and its criticisms of modern culture, and then moves from Nietzschean and Heideggerian thought to the hermeneutic theory of Gadamer and Ricoeur. After this, the course assesses the political relevance of the poststructuralism of Foucault, Derrida, and Lyotard. It concludes with Habermas' discourse ethics and deliberative democracy. (3 units; Spring, odd years)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation

This course is a history of the diplomatic relations of the United States and the development of the leading principles of foreign policy set within the context of an analysis of various geo-political models. (3 units; Spring, odd years, & Online)

InstructorStart DateDaysTimeLocation
POL443-A
STAFF, STAFF
01/13/2025 MWF 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM TBA