Quick Links

Live Your Purpose

CAL BAPTIST

Bachelor of Arts in Behavioral Science

The Behavioral Science major is a broad program drawn from the modern behavioral sciences of anthropology, psychology, and sociology and includes the full methodological skills common to those behavioral sciences. The program also includes a Christian perspective of theology as a behavioral science. The major prepares graduates for employment in social service careers, and for graduate study in Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology. Students are encouraged to pursue a complimentary minor.

TRADITIONAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Behavioral Science Major (50 units) BA

Lower Division Requirements

BEH 100 Survey of Behavioral Science OR SOC 213 OR ANT 225

PSY 213 General Psychology

Methodology Requirements

BEH 250 Professional Reading and Writing in the Behavioral Science

BEH 333 Epistemology and Worldview

BEH 383 Statistical Techniques in Behavioral Science with SPSS

BEH 385 Methods of Research with SPSS

Upper Division Requirements

ANT 325 Physical Anthropology

ANT 430 Culture and Personality

CBS 350 Development and Discipleship

PSY 320 Life Span Development

PSY 322 Theories of Personality

PSY 346 Abnormal Psychology

SOC 335 Social Problems

SOC 337 Deviant Behavior

SOC 345 Sociology of Diversity

SOC 381 Social Theory

Optional Concentrations* (12 units)

Students can earn a concentration in the following areas by completing the certificate requirements**: Anthropology, Christian Behavioral Science, Cognitive Psychology, Counseling Ministry, Diversity, Life Span Development, Psychology, Religion and Behavior, or Social Work.

*Each optional concentration requires the completion of twelve (12) distinct units beyond the major.

**Certificate requirements are located in the Academic Program section of the catalog by certificate title.

This page was updated on March 21, 2011.

Behavioral Science Major (53 units) BA

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Content Knowledge and Theories consistent with the standards of APA, AAA, and ASA
    • Explain the major historical theories of psychology, anthropology, sociology and their influence on developing theories, the individual and society
    • Understand and critique methods of critical analysis/research and articulate their influence on the field of psychology, anthropology, and sociology for an understanding of human behavior
    • Verbalize and analyze the terminology of psychology, anthropology, sociology and theology
  • Critical thinking skills, analysis and synthesis of the research literature across the behavioral sciences including psychology, anthropology, and sociology
    • Use and apply psychology, anthropology, and sociology concepts to explain personal experiences and recognize the limitations of personal experience in understanding empirical phenomenon
    • Differentiate the behavioral science theoretical foundations from pseudoscience/anecdote as well as develop an understanding of cultural perspectives
    • Contrast and compare Western Culture and the Judeo-Christian worldview
    • Use quantitative and/or qualitative analyses to argue for or against a particular hypotheses within specific contexts (research, professional practice and daily living)
  • Communication: speaking and writing skills; technology literacy and research skills consistent with the standards of APA, AAA, and ASA
    • Conduct and write a review that summarizes part of the anthropology, psychology, and sociology literature, applying fundamental strategies such as a thesis focus, an informative middle and an effective conclusion resulting from effective drafting, revising, and editing
    • Use and define terms and concepts of the discipline and applying them appropriately, showing a strong & direct link between concepts and assigned reading
    • Deliver effective oral presentations in a variety of communication settings, using standard diction of American English in a professional manner including dress and demeanor
    • Lead and participate effectively in group discussions, applying active listening skills and a respect for diverse views in interpersonal settings
    • Select the most appropriate sources and databases for accessing and obtaining the needed information. Examines and compares information from various sources in order to ascertain the reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias of a given source
  • Integrity/values: academic integrity, discipline specific ethical issues; an understanding of ethics; respect for social diversity
  • Project management: team work skills; informed participation in multiple levels of community applying academic studies to the workplace and professional environments

Lower Division Requirements

Choose one (1) of the following courses

Methodology Requirements

Upper Division Requirements

Optional Concentrations* (12 units)

Students can earn a concentration in the following areas by completing the certificate requirements**: Anthropology, Christian Behavioral Science, Cognitive Psychology, Counseling Ministry, Diversity, Life Span Development, Psychology, Religion and Behavior, or Social Work.

*Each optional concentration requires the completion of twelve (12) distinct units beyond the major.

**Certificate requirements are located in the Academic Program section of the catalog by certificate title.