Quick Links

Live Your Purpose

CAL BAPTIST

Bachelor of Arts in Antropology

The Anthropology major is based on the traditional emphasis of culture and personality in anthropology, and the emergent field of cross-cultural psychology.

Program Requirements

Psychological Anthropology Major (44 units) BA

Lower Division Requirements

ANT 225 Cultural Anthropology

Methodology Requirements

BEH 250 Professional Reading and Writing in the Behavioral Science

BEH 333 Epistemology and Worldview

BEH 383 Statistical Techniques in Behavioral Science with SPSS

BEH 385 Methods of Research with SPSS

Upper Division Requirements

ANT 325 Physical Anthropology and Archaeology

ANT 340 Theory in Anthropology

ANT 350 Language and Culture

ANT 430 Culture and Personality

Concentration Courses (12-15 Units)

Cultural Anthropology

ANT 360 Globalization and Culture

ANT 400 Special Topics in Anthropology

ANT 410 Economic and Political Anthropology

ANT 450 Kinship and Family

Psychological Anthropology

PSY 213 General Psychology

PSY 320 Life-Span Development

PSY 322 Theories of Personality

PSY 346 Abnormal Psychology

PSY 473 Psychophysiology

Optional Concentrations* (12 units)

Students can earn a concentration in the following areas by completing the certificate requirements**: Christian Behavioral Science, Cognitive Psychology, Diversity, Life Span Development, Religion and Behavior, or Social Work.

*Each optional concentration requires the completion of twelve (12) distinct units beyond the major.

**Certificate requirements are located in the Academic Program section of the catalog by certificate title.

This page was updated March 21, 2011.

Anthropology Major (47-50 units) BA

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Content, knowledge and skills (theories, concepts, & terms) consistent with the American Anthropological Association
    • To articulate the theories, concepts and terms of the four fields in anthropology: culture, biology, archeology, linguistics
    • To apply the foundational tenants of anthropology including: cultural relativism versus ethnocentrism, an integrated and holistic perspective to culture and an etic versus emic approach to studying culture
    • To recognize the core anthropologists and their contributions in the development of the discipline including Franz Boas, Branislow Malinowski, Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, and Don Johanson
  • Critical thinking: skill in analysis, synthesis, and use of evidence; problem solving (reflective & analytical)
  • Communication: speaking and writing skills; technology literacy; research skills
    • Conduct and write a review that summarizes part of the anthropology literature, applying fundamental strategies such as a thesis focus, an informative middle and an effective conclusion resulting from effective drafting, revising, and editing
    • Use and define terms and concepts of the discipline and applying them appropriately, showing a strong & direct link between concepts and assigned reading
    • Deliver effective oral presentations in a variety of communication settings, using standard diction of American English in a professional manner including dress and demeanor
    • Lead and participate effectively in group discussions, applying active listening skills and a respect for diverse views in interpersonal settings
    • Select the most appropriate sources and databases for accessing and obtaining the needed information. Examines and compares information from various sources in order to ascertain the reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias of a given source.
  • Integrity/values: academic integrity, discipline specific ethical issues; an understanding of ethics; respect for social diversity
  • Project management: team work skills; informed participation in multiple levels of community applying academic studies to the workplace and professional environments

Lower Division Requirements

Methodology Requirements

Upper Division Requirements

Concentration Courses (12-15 Units)

Students must complete all requirements in one of the following concentrations listed below:

Cultural Anthropology (12 units)

Psychological Anthropology (15 units)

Optional Additional Concentrations* (12 units) 

Students can earn a concentration in the following areas by completing the certificate requirements**: Christian Behavioral Science, Cognitive Psychology, Diversity, Life Span Development, or Religion and Behavior.

*Each optional concentration requires the completion of twelve (12) distinct units beyond the major. 

**Certificate requirements are located in the Academic Program section of the catalog by certificate title.